The First Week of a Newborn

Now that Naomi is already two months old, I can really say that the hardest part of having a newborn is on their first week of arrival. And I’m not making this post to scare new mum or those currently in pregnant, but I think we all should be prepared for what about to come (specifically for pregnant mum out there). Here’s why :

  1. When your baby first deliver, you will immediately receive a skin to skin bonding. The nurse or midwife will put your baby on your chest area and lead her for immediate latching. This was a new experience for me, because with my son I didn’t have the chance to experience immediate skin to skin bonding. He was premature and was rushed to the Natal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) right after he got cleaned. I was only able to kiss him for a split second. But with Naomi, the doctor and midwife put her on my chest area and was able to latch for thirty minutes non stop. I was crying with happy tears and amazed to know that she can do that.
  2. Breastfeeding is a full time commitment. I’m not trying to whine, but having to exclusively breastfeeding Naomi is also a new thing for me and I was so exhausted during the first couple of weeks. Nobody told me that when you breastfeed, you’ll get very little time for yourself, let alone for a good seven to eight hour of sleep. Turns out newborn needs to be fed every one and a half to two hours and for a good 20 minutes per feed. I was pretty overwhelmed, because again with my son this didn’t happened. He was fed half breast milk half formula. Since he was in the NICU for almost ten days, and I didn’t get the stimulation from him, hence my milk decided to go west. So he needs the formula to get full, and because he is full my milk supply is going chaotic and he rely mostly on formula. However, with Naomi that wasn’t the case. My milk supply (thankfully) is sufficient and she seems to LOVE it a lot. Because she can really latch for hours…like hours…non stop. Not that I complain, but at that time I was so tired that I become a bit jiffy. My advice, always try to sleep whenever the baby is asleep. Light nap will help even if it just for an hour. Trust me, it adds up.
  3. Changing diaper. In the early life, baby tends to have at least one dirty diaper for each day life. This means one dirty diaper on day one, two on day two and so on and so on. On day one, the dirty diaper will have black color due to meconium and on day four it will turn to yellow and the baby will have at least 3-4 stools daily. Since Naomi is breastfed, her stools tends to be loose (soft and runny) with sometimes may be seedy. She also stool every time she was nurse, and this is normal because some baby just does.
  4. During the first week until almost a month, we almost always keep the room temperature at 25 to 26 degree Celsius. This is important since the baby needs to be kept warm or she would feel cold. Baby tends to feel cold easily.
  5. Mild jaundice may occur, but that’s fine. However, Naomi had quite high on the test thus the doctor asked her to have two days of blue light treatment. If this happens to you don’t fret, you just need to keep pumping those breast milk and provide the baby with as much milk as he/she needs. I was pumping my milk every hour and send it to the hospital. Lucky for us the hospital is just five minutes away. Even so, on the second day we decided to open a room in the hospital to make it easier while breastfeeding or pumping.

So that’s about it. My first week with a newborn. I am so happy to have her and completed our little family, and I’m so looking forward for other memories to build.

Hope this post help or at least open up your idea of having to deal with a newborn. Until next time!

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